New early warning system to provide increased protection for 1.7 million people; cost of climate hazards could top $12 billion from 2021 to 2030

Georgia. 27 February 2018 –With financing from the Green Climate Fund, UNDP will launch a US$70 million project to expand early warning systems and measures aiming to increase disaster resilience for 1.7 million people.

Without the proper adaptation measures, climate hazards could cost the people of Georgia between $10 and $12 billion from 2021 to 2030. In contrast, the estimated cost of adapting to climate change over the same time-period is estimated between $1.5 billion and $2 billion.

“Climate hazards are derailing government-led efforts to reduce environmental risks in Georgia,” said Levan Davitashvili, Minister of Environment Protection and Agriculture of Georgia. “This new project will provide increased protection for over 40 percent of Georgia’s population from fast-acting floods and other natural disasters.”

The seven-year programme received a $27 million grant from the Green Climate Fund (GCF), $38 million in co-finance from the Government of Georgia, and a $5 million grant from the Swiss Government. The project will be implemented in close partnership by UNDP and the Ministry of Environment Protection and Agriculture of Georgia.

“Investing in climate resilience is good for economy and good for our people,” said Levan Davitashvili, Minister of Environment Protection and Agriculture of Georgia. “To date, risk management in Georgia has largely been reactive, rather than proactive. This has meant large costs to compensate the victims of floods and other natural hazards, the increased number of ‘eco-migrants’ leaving vulnerable areas, and higher costs for recovery. This project signals a paradigm shift centred around risk reduction, prevention and preparedness.”

The project will achieve its goals of deploying an effective nation-wide multi-hazard system by scaling-up of several projects and initiatives already creating positive impact in Georgia. One example comes from the UNDP-supported project, financed through the Adaptation Fund, that improved forecasting and early warning systems in the Rioni Basin, promoted climate-informed development policies, and demonstrated concrete community adaptation action in the high risk areas.

Across the globe, governments are leveraging support from the United Nations Development System to improve climate information and early warning systems. In addition to the Georgia project, the governments of Malawi and Uganda recently launched new GCF-financed initiatives that connect climate information with poverty reduction, food security and improved livelihoods. With funding from the Adaptation Fund, Global Environment Facility and Green Climate Fund, UNDP supports a global portfolio of projects on climate information and early warnings to facilitate risk-informed public investment planning.

“As Georgia moves forward to achieving its national Sustainable Development Goals, the Climate Action becomes a crucial priority to build the adaptive capacity the country needs to ensure climate-resilient development into the 21st Century. UNDP stands ready to assist the Government of Georgia in improving the collection of climate information, planning and decision-making across all sectors,” said Niels Scott, UNDP Resident Representative in Georgia.

For additional information please contact Sophie Tchitchinadze at sophie.tchitchinadze@undp.org or visit http://www.ge.undp.org

Explore more

UNDP’s climate box, launched last year to teach children how to lead climate - and environmentally -…

Climate change impacts in Eastern Europe and Central Asia currently cost billions of dollars in lost…

The conference will bring together governments, practitioners and experts to better understand…

Psychologists, social workers, legal advisors will begin to provide free services to survivors of…

Over 90 government representatives from Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Caucasus will exchange…

The new action focusing on job creation, municipal services and Turkish language trainings is…

Thirty years ago, a powerful earthquake ripped through my home country of Armenia, leaving 25,000…

According to an independent climate tracker, current climate pledges are insufficient to keep global…

Most people who live in Central Asia are too young to remember the devastating earthquakes from the…

In May 2014, Bosnia and Herzegovina was hit by devastating floods causing loss of human life, and…

Since childhood, my imaginary happy place was always a small house in the mountains besides a…

Natural disasters disproportionately affect women and children, especially in countries where…

UNDP Around the world

You are at UNDP Europe and Central Asia 
Go to UNDP Global